LEYES DE LA ESPOSA ENTRE LAS HIJAS DE SION DILECTISSIMA. [TOGETHER WITH] CANCIONES MISTICAS DE UNA ALMA QUE A DIOS, NUESTRO SENOR, COMPUNGIDA SE ACUSA QUEXA I LAMENTA SI PROPIA. HECHAS POR EL REVDO. PADRE FRAY PEDRO LUIS DEL BARCO. PREDICADOR APOSTOLICO
Agreda, Maria de Jesus de; Diego Gentico.

Santiago de Queretaro: [1743?]. [16] 442 [2]; several leaves misnumbered, actual page count is 450; pages clean with some contemporary repairs made to paper; sheepskin with ornate gold tooling but heavily rubbed and cracked; joints cracked but holding Good Hardcover Transcribed by Fr. Diego Gentico in the temple of Cruz de Queretaro, Mexico during the mid-18th century from a manuscript by Maria de Jesus de Agreda, a Conceptionist nun, Christian mystic and icon in the early colonial history of the Americas, particularly the Southwest. Gentico, at the time he transcribed this work, was a resident at the Convento de la Cruz in Santiago de Queretaro, better known as the point of departure for the Franciscan missions that led to the founding of the California missions along El Camino Real. Agreda is most well-known for her work Mystical City of God, which was dictated to her by the Blessed Virgin Mary. Her family home was turned into a Conceptionist monastery and she served as counselor to Philip IV. Her writings are considered an important contribution to Baroque literature, which defines this period of Spanish history. While Mystical City of God is often studied, no printed copy of this work is recorded before 1916. She is often credited with having the gift of bi-location--the ability to appear in multiple places at once--after sightings were reported among the Jumano people in what is now west Texas and New Mexico. Some sources suggest that Agreda's blue habit (and her unofficial title as "The Lady in Blue") was, in part, inspiration for Texas' state flower, the bluebonnet. The literary significance of Agreda, her importance to the development of the Americas, the work of this copyist in provincial Mexico and the subsequent lack of distribution make this expansive manuscript a particularly interesting item. One other copy is listed in OCLC, but the pagination is significantly different. The hymnal at the end of the book comprises pages 410ff. One hundred and twentythree nine-line poems are split into various sections titled, "A la santissima encanacion [sic]," "Al santisimo nacimiento del niño Jesus," "A la crcunsicion del niño Jesus," "La huida a Egipto" and a final decima is included on a page was seemingly cancelled but later repaired. There is no record of it being published. Includes a table of contents (Item ID: 172637)

$4,800.00

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